Composta – a plant pot and worm bin in one!

I love my worm farms and have two, happily churning away my food scraps. I have two bottomless pots in my wicking garden and feed compost worms in one then the other to encourage them to move throughout the garden doing their busy best for the soil. However, I have just found a great new worm farm that is an attractive large plant pot with a worm tower in the centre. Composta will be a welcome addition to my edible garden.

Unique worm farm. Great Australian design. Composta Australia.

The plant pot is large and attractive and the worm tower is placed in the centre before filling the pot section with potting mix. The worms are added to the tower along with vegetable scraps. You are then ready to plant your choice of plants so that they can take advantage of the benefits of the hard working worms who will venture throughout the pot and break down your vegetable scraps and replace them with high value worm castings. The unique drainage system ensures that the worms will not be drowned in the event of rain or if you add water to the pot. You can put a container under the drain hole to collect the liquid for your garden or other pots, too.

I was quite impressed with my Composta when it arrived and the grandchildren are excite to get it started and planted out on their next visit. When I looked through the gallery on the Composta site, I had to buy another one for my beans and peas. With the addition of poles or a cone plant trainer

These would make great presents for fledgling and experience gardeners alike and the large pot will hold a good supply of herbs, flowers, strawberries, greens or whatever you decide to plant.

Ok, this is not the most frugal of ideas and many would say that they can create something similar with a little DIY inspiration, but this kit is ideal for many people who want to grow a few plants and reduce their waste a little, in an attractive and easy to manage system.

The unit comes with removable legs. I believe I will use these on my herb garden which will be outside my back door ready for the last minute dashes I inevitably do for herbs for meals. I never seem to remember until I am cooking that I needed a bit of this or a stalk of that and then it is off to the cupboard to find the torch and wander around in the back yard, visiting the garden.

I usually let most of my herbs go to seed so that I can have a supply of seeds for planting (such as lettuce, rocket and baby spinach) or for cooking (such as coriander and fennel seeds), so I will probably still plant herbs and greens elsewhere. Having a supply near the house for easy picking will be a pleasure and, when we get chickens in the very near future, will allow me to leave some garden herbs to them as payment for their digging over and de-bugging.

As for my beans, the Composta will work wonderfully sitting on my garden near fruit trees and with no need for the legs provided. The wormy goodness will be washed into the main garden to fertilise and add healthy micro-organisms around my edibles. I can’t wait!

I’ll post more personal pics as my Compostas progress and update with tips or info that I might learn along the way.

DISCLAIMER: This is merely the opinion of my humble self and BetR2 does not sell any products or have any relationship to products mentioned here.

I just like them!

 

 

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