BetR2 Scroll The Globe Awards – Vote for the next winner

BetR2 Scroll The Globe Awards – Vote for the next winner

For our second Betr2 Scroll The Globe Award we would like to give you a chance to choose from, and enjoy, the nominees. You get to review them and vote for your favourite.

And the Nominees are:

1. “Shoot the messenger why don’t cha? Don’t care if Hitler said it, it’s the truth”

Ford on hemp misquote

The first nominee is a comment made on a quote from Henry Ford that had been manipulated to support the hemp legalisation movement. Not that I’m for or against that movement, the useful material or the higher THC , but misquotes reduce the case rather than boosting it. The fact that Henry Ford didn’t say this talks volumns on the commenter and even the person who posted without checking the story.

There is some confusion about what is meant by the word hemp.  All hemp does not contain levels of THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) which creates the effects of the drug form of the plant – commonly called cannibis, weed, grass, etc. Find out more on Wikipedia – click here.

For those that wonder about the actual quote, here it is:
source http://www.thehenryford.org/research/henryFordQuotes.aspx

“I foresee the time when industry shall no longer denude the forests which require generations to mature, nor use up the mines which were ages in making, but shall draw its raw material largely from the annual produce of the fields. I am convinced that we shall be able to get out of yearly crops most of the basic materials which we now get from forest and mine.”

Close but no cigar (or preferred smoko).

2. “If you are going to stand on the roadside asking for {boobs}, you’d expect some knockers”

While discussing body image issues among children and young people, the segment “Kochie’s Angels” on Sydney’s Channel 7 morning show, reported on yet another young woman who stood on a roadside begging for money for breast implants by carrying a sign that said, “Not Homeless, Need Boobs”.

http://au.tv.yahoo.com/sunrise/video/watch/18460280/kochies-angels-august-12/

The story starts at 5.35 (3.09 for the whole topic) and the quote is at around 6.05 minutes on the sunrise video.

Apart from the funny yet very sad world where this occurs, or even the fact that this makes the news even though it is just a copycat of the last sad young woman that did this, I was dumstruck when one of the panellists came up with this quote. (she might be a good actor, but it appears to have been a slip rather than a scripted comment. You can decide.)

Here is the story about the boob bludge: http://www.thechronicle.com.au/news/woman-takes-streets-beg-bigger-boobs/1980024/

3.  “No one: however smart; however well-educated; however experienced, is the suppository of all knowledge.”

Someone needs to explain the meaning of the word suppository to the Rhodes Scholar who is currently the opposition leader in Australia and is the Man Who Would Be King – well, Prime Minister – in only a few short weeks. Honestly what are they teaching them in Rhodes these days? (that was tongue-in-cheek, please don’t tell me the degree in from Oxford University)

source: http://www.theage.com.au/federal-politics/the-pulse-live/election-wrap-august-12-2013-20130812-2rqvs.html

The quote is at about 47sec to 1min on the reporter’s short follow up on Tony Abbott’s day including this gaffe. Sadly this week was gaffe-a-day week for Mr Abbott who turned the pollie campaign trail habit of kissing babies into kissing the back of baby’s mother’s head; Abbot Kissing the Back of Mother's head instead of the baby oops

He also couldn’t think of anything better to compare a female canditate, Fiona Scott, to Jackie Kelly (who won the seat of Lindsay for the Liberal Party in 1996) than, “They umm are young, ummm feisty and ummm, I think I can say, have a bit of sex appeal”. One would think that attributes that suit them to political life could rate a mention, Mr Abbott.

Abbott describes candidate as having sex appeal

And you think you’d like to be the Prime Minister? Reaaalllyyy?

4. “Monsanto”

Now, far be it from me than to deny that Monsanto may be behind many of the ills of this world, but this comment – “Monsanto” – was on a post by Science is Awesome – on Facebook – that showed a water bottle which was labelled using the proper chemical name of water and some wordy terminology for sweating, urination and hydration. Monsanto might try to patent most things on the planet, don’t think they’ve tried for water … yet.

Most comments were along the lines of, “LOL” and, “Where do I get one” or even, “H2O”. Though some planted the tongue securely into the cheek with comments like, “yer, scary! if this stuff gets into your lungs, it can kill” – maybe they deserve the nomination, instead?

water bottle labelled with big words

5. “Do you need a couch to lay down on?”

Our final nomination is a comment made during a prank on the Mornings show on Channel 9 Sydney. David Campbell dressed up as a chair and Sonja then interviewed all their favourite guests. One after another they came and sat on the not-so-comfortable chair and started to answer questions only to jump out of their skins when David gave them a cuddle.

When Michael Usher (at 2.35 minutes on the video) was surprised he said, “I need to lay down”, to which the chair said, “do you need a couch to lay down on?”

I thought that was funnier than the prank itself. Well played, David Campbell.

Who do you think gets the Scroll The Globe Award? You can vote on the poll or simply leave a comment.

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Scroll the Globe – Betr2 Awards for Notable Comments

Scroll the Globe – Betr2 Awards for Notable Comments

BetR2 Scroll the Globe Award template with map
I am one of those people that will read all the comments on a post and am often inspired, educated, amused or bemused by them. The set of comments on any one post form a conversation, often that the commenters are unaware of.

Just as in all human communications, some open their mouths loudly and a cacophony of opinion very loosely based on the post fills the cyber air (perhaps based on some previously formed values, beliefs, biases or understanding that the commenter holds, or merely on the fact that they have seen this information before, therefore it must be right/wrong or indifferent):

  • Some yell in unison with the writer, drawn by whatever slant or bias the reporter puts on the information, and whole-heartedly agreeing, “so it shall be!”;
  • Some comment as the ‘devil’s advocate’, always in partial disagreement or in order to limit the viability of the writers argument;
  • Yet others seem to have read every detail of the post, investigated further and come back to increase the validity or share further information with the writer and their followers.
  • And then, there are those that just make a comment that takes me away from my in depth reading and takes me to some other place. Perhaps a light hearted comment in a discussion that has got a little out of hand or a shallow comment on a post that has tugged on the emotions of the audience.

On such social media as Facebook, I am always astonished that people don’t ‘get’ the discussion, but am very aware that this is often because the discussion itself is received and stored as if it is one of those concertina card wallets, that the comedians used in the old slap-stick comedy days (they open the wallet and the cards concertina to the floor). It is only if you click this and open that that you know the full story. Some respond directly to the post only, without ever going to the discussion at all.

Each to their own, and this is the nature of social media, but I find it to be a little like walking past the town meeting and shouting something in through the door based on the billboard out the front.

I find some comments, and posts, that are quite interesting and out of the ordinary as well as some throw away comments that I think are real gold.

I intend to bring these out of the mire of insignificance so they can receive the respect, mirth or exposure they deserve.

So, the inaugural award goes to the veiled depth, shallowness and complete irrelevancy of this comment on a quite heated and in-depth discussion:

“Too many people have opinions”

Nice to be popular, but no thanks…. spammers and me don’t mix

Nice to be popular, but no thanks…. spammers and me don’t mix

Well, I don’t know whether to be impressed or upset. My fledgling blog has 60 comments (included my own) but:

Akismet has protected your site from 246 spam comments already.

dashboard re spam spam and more spam

dashboard re spam spam and more spam


I am happy that I am getting protected from the spammers, at least. WordPress seems to be one of the better providers, in my humble opinion.

I actually enjoy reading the spam comments as some of them are obviously spam with multiple links to seedy and commercial sites, etc. Others are, sadly, worded with treachery and pretending to be actually interested, pleased, angered or supportive of my posts.

When I write on someone else’s blog, I usually have more to say than, “Great blog. I am very interested in this topic” OR “This is strong in word. I am wonder you are is your own work?” Or even, “I instead used oregano and find it tasty also” (this one turned up on a blog post which had nothing to do with cooking, bit of a give away). However, sometimes I just want someone to know that I like what they wrote or how it is written. I take care now to make sure they know I actually read their post and my comment has no agenda.