Go, Seattle! That’s how to do a Community Garden!

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San Francisco Happenings: An Empty Lot Blossoms into a Beautiful Community Art Garden

This is a brilliant record of a community garden from woe to go. I am hoping to do something similar for Equilibrium Future Solutions amazing Natural Gardens which we have enjoyed watching emerge from nothingness.

Theresa Buoy

A sunny warm San Francisco Saturday unfolded like a picnic blanket on the grass at Dolores Park.

Today’s main event was a Alice in Wonderland themed tea party fundraiser for the Please Touch Community Garden, a creative space that was founded by one of my dearest friends, GK Callahan, artist and MFA student at the California College of the Arts.

I can still remember in January 2010, when GK and I, were vacationing in Mexico, and he received the news that he had the green light to plant this seed of a project. His vision was expansive- to turn a run down, needle-strewn vacant lot across the street from City Hall, into a community garden, when everyone, including the blind community from the LightHouse for the Blind across the street could come and enjoy the sun.

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Above: A photo of artist GK Callahan and myself in 2011 at the lot.

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To be unlike virus’ who kill their hosts

Seattle's Beacon Food Forest Schematic Plan by Harrison Design

Seattle’s Beacon Food Forest Schematic Plan by Harrison Design


“To empower ourselves and be the intelligence and processors of nutrients from the forest we steward. To be similar to beneficial bacteria that maintain our ability for resiliency and good health and to be very unlike and have no reference to virus’ who kill their hosts. Long live the ability and will power for Humanity to evolve with its Host, Earth.”

Read about Beacon Food Forest, Seattle on their website:
This is how we move forward co-operatively! http://beaconfoodforest.weebly.com/news.html

Another Link about Beacon Food Forest:
Andrea Watts has written a great article on Seedstock.com (http://seedstock.com/2013/04/10/beacon-food-forest-brings-together-diverse-community-to-regenerate-public-lands) which explains some of the hows and some of the how-it-nearly-didn’ts of Beacon Food Forest. It took some striving to get it happening and there’ll need to be more to get the project completed. It is a five year project and stage 1 is done.

How Does Your Garden Grow?

How Does Your Garden Grow?

Let’s share our connection with the soil, plants, food and fun! Whether you just keep your shallots (green onions) fresh in a glass of water or you manage a sustainable farm or acreage; whether you grow flowers, herbs or produce for market, would love to know about it. Community is what it is all about!

marymaryquitecontrary

Do you follow any particular methods? Make your own: compost? soil? preserves? ferments? garden beds? water systems? wildlife habitats? etc, etc?

Have you been able to reduce: waste, water usage, electricity usage, food bills, poverty in your area? Have you been able to increase: fresh local food for your family, quality of your soil, community involvement, Clean energy, public education, scientific knowledge?

Have you written or read a good book or helpful article lately?

Where do you grow? What do you grow? How do you grow? Who do you grow with? What do you cook? What motivates you? ….what ever is in your heart.

Each of us has a part to play in changing the direction humanity takes from this day on.

Seattle Food Forest Park

Seattle Food Forest Park

Seattle food forest

From a post on 26 Nov 2012 which starts, “131 people made the choice to go out in November and build a food forest this weekend. We moved 80 yards (!) of arbor chip mulch, 20 yards of compost, piles of cardboard and burlap and built a huge Nut tree bed. We put in many trees and almost finished our extensive swale system. Wow, community power.” to more recent post that states, “We successfully sheet mulched another 1200 square feet of grass into forest floor for our Fig and Asian pear trees.” This project is one very happening community garden, indeed.

So, it can be done….who’s next????